Create interest by adding a talent show to your lesson

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Do you want your students to deeply engage in a new skill?  Or want to encourage them to work harder and longer?  Try adding a “talent show” portion to your PE class.  I tried this last week with fun results.  I set out jump ropes and hula hoops in the gym.  I told my 3rd and 4th graders that I wanted them to become an expert at one trick.  They were to choose a piece of equipment and practice with it for about 18 minutes.  Their trick could be on their own or with a partner.  I saved about 10 minutes at the end of class for a “talent show”.  At talent show time I had them sit on the floor with hands off equipment.  We used the stage and had volunteers come up one or two at a time and show their trick.  Almost everyone volunteered.  We had some really fun and creative tricks!  The students loved showing their stuff and really worked hard during class time.  It also stopped the constant stream of kids trying to get me to come watch them during class.  You could try this with other types of equipment too.  Basketball dribbling tricks, tossing and catching tricks, etc.


Animal warm-up

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Add some fun and creativity to your warm-ups with this animal warm-up.   It is perfect for your youngest students!

Set up 4 or more cones around the perimeter of your space.  As children enter, instruct them to choose a cone and sit next to it.  Choose an animal for the students to imitate.  For example, I started with a seal.  I had the students lay on their bellies and stretch their “flippers” behind their back.  Then they seal-walked by pulling themselves with their flippers to the next closest cone.  We repeated with a new animal.  “Stand up and stretch your quadricep.  Now use your quadriceps to jump like a frog to the next cone.”  Once we had done 4 animals (or as many as you have cones set up) as a group, I placed a label on each cone that matched the animals we had just practiced.  One cone was labeled “seal”, one was “frog”, “bear”, and “crab”.  I played music and starting at their current cone the students would move like that animal until they got to the next cone.  They then read the label and switched their movement to a different animal.  We continued for about 3 minutes in this fashion.  Total time  equals about 8 minutes and the students were warmed up and ready to go.  My students love to use their imagination with movement!


Small space ideas

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Do any of you PE teachers out there ever get kicked out of your gym?  Or are you a classroom teacher looking for ways to get your class moving and release some energy.  We had an assembly at our school today.  Every time we have an assembly, I lose my gym and have to teach PE in the classroom.  Here is what I did today with my 3rd grade class when I found out last minute that I did not have a gym.

Warm-up game:

I set up 6 cones around the room and told the students to find a cone to sit next to (limit 5 people per cone).  I didn’t move any desks, just put them anywhere there was a few feet of space!  I told the groups to quickly decide who in their group would go first, then have that person stand up.  (one group couldn’t make the decision peacefully so I made it for them)  I had 6 groups so I put 6 dice on one of the desks.  The lead person from each group came to the desk and rolled a die then went back to their group and told them the number they had rolled.  I wrote an activity on the whiteboard (jumping jacks).  The group had to do the number of jumping jacks to match their die roll.  I have dice that number 1-20.  Once all groups were done, we repeated with  new students rolling the dice and a new activity on the board.  I mixed in some math such as multiply your number by 10 and hold a plank for that many seconds.  Repeat until everyone has had a turn to roll the dice.

Token Rock Paper Scissors:

After our warm-up game I had them return to their desks and told them I would give them something if they were sitting quietly (good way to calm them back down to listen to new instructions).  I passed out 3 small round marker tokens to each of them.  This is an easy game.  The students walk around and challenge each other to Rock Paper Scissors.  The loser has to give the winner one of his/her tokens.  If they run out of tokens, they come to me and I give them a task to earn a new one such as “do 25 jumping jacks”.  The game can go on as long as you allow it.  Then count tokens and declare a winner if wanted.

That’s it!  30 minutes of small space activity with little equipment needed.  My class loved both activities.  I’ve tried both of these activities with grades 1-5 and had great success.


Warm-up dance for Christmastime

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I am very insecure when it comes to teaching dances.  However, this particular dance is so cute and easy that even I can remember and teach it.  I used it as a warm-up activity because it gets your heart rate going and is simple to teach.

Use the song Trepak from the Nutcracker.  It is just over 2 minutes long.  Movement starts right at the first note.

one arm up in the air

2nd arm up in the air

Walk in a circle for 8 counts, ending facing front

Repeat 4 times

4 heel kicks on each foot (total 8 counts)

8 straight jumps

4 heel kicks on each foot

8 straight jumps

4 heel kicks per foot

2 heel kicks per foot

single heel kicks (total of 4 on each foot, going back and forth)

one arm up

2nd arm up

walk in a circle 8 counts

one arm up

2nd arm up

walk in a circle 32 counts (as the song ends, I have the students raise both hands and bow)

That’s it.  I go through each movement beforehand without telling them it is a dance.  Then just start the music and begin.  They immediately smile and get into it.  Repeat 2 times so they learn then do.  Kindergarten I did not count the heel kicks — just randomly kick.


Using stations/centers/rotations in PE class

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A popular day in my PE class is when we do “PE centers” (or rotation stations).  As many classroom teachers use centers as a way to teach small groups, the students are familiar with rotating through different stations and like seeing it in a PE setting.  And they love the variety.  I find it a good way to mix in favorites with something new or a skill I want to work on.

Here is an example of how I used centers this week with my first and second grade classes:

We have been working on the skill of dribbling a ball, as well as bouncing and catching.  I had taught lessons the previous 2 weeks focusing on these skills.  Today I began class by teaching them the game of straddle ball.  I let them play the game for about 5 minutes with the class divided into 3 groups.  While they were playing I set up 3 stations.  Our 3 centers were:

  1. Dribbling practice
  2. Straddle ball
  3. Shooting

For station one I threw down about 12 poly spots.  Students had to stand on a spot and dribble 10 times, then move to another spot and repeat.  When they hit 100 dribbles they come and give me a high five and then try to get to 200, etc.   We had played this game the week before so they were familiar with it and needed no explanation.  This was the station where I focused my time to help those that were still struggling with dribbling with one hand only.

Station 2 was just continuing the game I had just taught.  They were loving that game so it gave them more time to play, but also broke things up to keep it from getting too wild (as games often do if they go too long).

Station 3 was very informal.  I set up two small, portable, shorter hoops that I have in the same area and the standard level wall mount hoop.  I gave no formal instruction and just let them experiment.  My students are always begging to use my small hoops so it gave them that opportunity.

I played music and stopped it when it was time to rotate stations.  I was able to focus on the dribbling skill with a small number of students.  They always love it when we do centers.   I use them with all grade levels periodically with as few as 3 centers and as many as 12.  Usually it is a formal rotation as I’ve described, but I also sometimes let them choose and move through stations at their own pace.


Kindergarten and spatial awareness

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One of my main objectives with my kindergarten classes is to teach them spatial awareness and control.  We do a lot of games that have them moving around the gym in random patterns trying to keep them from “popping bubbles”.  Today while we were playing I told them that if the popped someone’s bubble (ran into someone)  they had to come to a certain location and sit for 5 seconds and then rejoin the game.  I couldn’t believe how well it worked!  They all tried so much harder to stay in their own space.  Their concentration was adorable.  They were also very honest about sitting out for the 5 seconds when contact occured.  Give this idea a try with any of your younger grades!


Muscle mini lesson

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This year in PE we are focusing on a different muscle every month.  Since I don’t want to spend any movement time having my students sit and listen, I talk about our muscle as we do our stretches.  Here is an example of a mini lesson I did this week focusing on the calf muscle.

Introduction:  We are starting a new month today so that means we have a new muscle to learn.  What was our muscle last month? (quadricep)  Where is the quadricep? This month we are going to learn about the calf.  When I stand on tip toes you will be able to see my calf muscle.  Stand in front of the group flat footed, and then go to tip toe.  Did you see the calf muscle engage?

Activity:  Everyone stand up right where you are and try standing on your tip toes.  Do you feel you muscle engaging.  Can you see the outline of your calf muscle.

Activity:  Teach a stretch for the calf muscle:  Take a big step back.  Make sure both toes point forward with your body.  Push your back heel to the ground.  Bend your back knee a little if you need to to feel the stretch.  I walk around and correct form.  Talk about the need to keep toes pointing forward to actually stretch the right muscle since this is a common mistake in form I see with my students.

Activity:  Ask for suggestions of motions that use the calf muscle and do some of them such as running or jumping rope.

As the month goes on, we will repeat our calf stretch every class period and emphasize movement activities that engage the calf muscle.

My students are loving this.  They were actually the ones who reminded me that it was a new month and asked what our new muscle would be!


Fire and Ice Tag game

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My first and second graders love tag games.  This is a fun spin on frozen tag.

4-5 blue yarn balls

3 red yarn balls

The blue yarn balls represent “ice”.  Students with ice are “it” and try and tag others.  If you are tagged by ice you must freeze.  I have them put their arms up so everyone can tell they are frozen.  The red balls represent “fire”.  Students with fire try and save frozen students by unthawing the ice (tagging with red ball).  Stop the game every 3-4 minutes and trade out who is playing fire and ice.


Visual aids for PE

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I am working this year to add some science into my PE classes so I decided to focus on learning the names of major muscle groups.  I made this fun bulletin board to add interest and add a fun visual image to my gym.  As you can see, we are going to focus on a muscle group each month.  As the school year moves along, I will add more labels to my HULK visual.  This popular character not only catches the attention of my young students, but his bulk makes the muscle groups easy to see.  I also showed my students a realistic photo of the muscular system inside a human body as I taught a mini lesson on muscles.  When we do our warm-up session, I focus on some stretches and activities that use the quadricep and talk as we stretch.  It has been a fun way to introduce some vocabulary.
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organizing teams

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I teach over 800 students every week, 30 minute classes, about 30 students per class.  I need efficient ways to divide my students into different size groups for different activities.  Sometimes I want like abilities together  and sometimes I like to mix skill levels.  Here are a couple ideas I use to divide classes up into teams:

1.  Play music and have the students just walk or dance around the room.  When the music stops they stand toe to toe with # (designate size of group by holding up number of fingers) of people.  I sometimes add restrictions such as wearing the same color, #boys#girls, etc.  Sometimes I repeat 2 or 3 times, telling them each time that they can’t have someone in their group who was in it the last round (good way to mix up friends)

2.  For outside, as the class arrives I give them a fitness task to complete.  As each child finishes I hand them a jersey to put on.  I have all my colors out and pre-counted so that as I hand them a jersey, I can mix up who is wearing what color.  Since my most athletic kids tend to finish the fitness task first, I can give each one a new color and have them evenly distributed.  Same idea with my slow students.  I end up with teams evenly divided and marked.  I sometimes have them do an activity with a partner wearing a different color jersey to keep them guessing!

These are my favorite and easiest team divisors.  How do you divide classes?