Music in PE and playlist idea

I’ve found that playing music adds a wonderful dimension to a PE class. I can use it to energize or calm down a class, or just add some fun. I love it when just the right song comes on and all the kids are singing along as they work on their skill or play a game. I often see, or get asked for requests, for song ideas for a PE playlist, so here are some ideas:

Current Disney or other movie hits are always great with little ones (K-2). Especially if there is a current movie out with a really great soundtrack. Frozen is a good example of this. When that movie came out, I could put the soundtrack on and the whole class would be singing along. It was adorable. (Now I get groans for Frozen songs so there is a definite time table)

Write down songs you hear at sporting events in your area. Chances are you have students that are attending those events and they will get excited to hear those songs.

Ask your older students for ideas. You’ll need to carefully screen and I scratch a lot (because I’m the one that hears them all day), but I do get a few good ones.

Make separate playlists for holidays and other special events. For example I have a playlist that has songs I only play for certain activities like Star Wars songs, Mission Impossible, swamp music, etc. I also have a Christmas playlist, Halloween playlist, and a tabata playlist that I use for warm-ups.

Here is my current (and always changing) PE playlist:

High Hopes/Panic at the Disco

Natural/Imagine Dragons

Life Changes/Thomas Rhett

Better When I’m Dancin’/Megan Trainor

Only Wanna Be With You/Hootie and the Blowfish

Connection/One Republic

Hall of Fame/The Script

Wake Me Up/Avicli

Glad You Came/The Wanted

Maps/Maroon 5

Cheerleader/OMI

Lift Me Up/One Republic

Out of My League/Fitz and The Tantrums

Baby Shark/Pinkfong

Immigrant Song/Led Zepplin

Dynamite/China Anne McClain

Pump Up the Jam/Crazy Frog

Fireflies/Owl City

La La La/Shakira

Can’t Stop The Feeling/Justin Timberlake

Keep Your Head Up/Andy Grammar

Different Colors/Walk The Moon

Hula Hoop/OMI

Whatever It Takes/Imagine Dragons

Mom/Meghan Trainor

Old Town Road/Lil Nas X (student request and favorite)

Happier/Marshmello

Zero/Imagine Dragons

Have It All/Jason Mraz

One Minute More/Capital Cities

Play That Song/Train

Wasted Time/Keith Urban

Walk Me Home/Pink

Rescue Me/One Republic (current favorite)

Shine/Collective Soul

Welcome to The Jungle/Guns N Roses

Hey, Soul Sister/Train

Grenade/Bruno Mars (student request)

Cake By The Ocean/DNCE (clean version)

Heaven/One Republic

Fine By Me/Andy Grammar

Try Everything/Shakira

Wonders/The Script

One Less Day/Rob Thomas

Take On Me/A-ha

Best Day of My Life/American Authors

Believer/American Authors

Superheroes/The Script

Brave/Sara Bareilles

Pompeii/Bastille

Because We Can/Bon Jovi

It’s Time/Imagine Dragons

Good Time/Owl City & Carly Rae Jeppson

The Middle/Jimmy Eats World

On Top of The World/Imagine Dragons

Funkytown/Lipps, Inc

Cool Kids/Echosmith

Viva La Vida/Coldplay

I Lived/One Republic

Sugar/Maroon 5

Don’t Stop/5 Seconds of Summer

Animal/Neon Trees

You’re My Best Friend/Queen

Life Is A Highway/Rascal Flatts

Ho Hey/Lumineers

Centuries/Fall Out Boy

Don’t Stop Believin’/Journey

House of Gold/Twenty One Pilots

Kernkraft 400/Zombie Nation (radio edit)

Rise/ Katy Perry

Luck/American Authors

I Like To Move It/Madagascar 5

One Thing/One Direction

Eye of The Tiger (many versions)

I Was Born/Hanson

Something Just Like This/Chainsmokers and Coldplay

Hopefully, this list will give some ideas of music that might be right for your class. Comment with your favorites because I always need new songs to keep things fresh!

Hopscotch and Making Recess Better!

One of my goals this year is to improve recess time at my school.  The students are all expected to be outside during recess, but otherwise, they can do whatever they want.  Unfortunately, some do not choose to be active during that time.  So, from my corner of the world as PE teacher I am trying to help encourage activity.  Here are some things I have done:

First, I put together this awesome recess cart!

img_6419

The school paid for the cart, and I had enough excess equipment to stock it.  I presented it to all my classes during the first week of school and talked about care and expectations with the equipment.  Now it is watched over by an aide at recess and students can check out any equipment.  I told my students it is like a “recess library”.

Next, after any activity we do at PE, I try and point out to them that this is something they could do at recess if they enjoyed it.  I want to expand their thinking on ways to be active.  Even if you don’t want to join in the soccer game, you can still be moving.

And, this week I have been teaching old-fashioned classic games that seem to have died off a bit.  I taught them 4 square.  This one is always popular, I just needed to clarify basic rules.  Then, I taught tetherball.  Our tether balls had been removed because the kids were sitting on them and snapped all the ropes.  Our custodian fixed them for me and I am trying to teach the kids how to play the game properly.  They are very excited about the tether balls joining the recess cart soon.

Finally, I taught them the real rules of hopscotch.  I attended a conference last fall and learned the “big kid” rules.  I couldn’t believe how fun and challenging it was!  I’ve gotten eye rolls from my 5th and 6th graders when I told them we were going to play hopscotch.  Once I teach them the kick-out method, they have loved the challenge and had a blast with it.  And, some of my more difficult, hard-to-move kids have found something they like!  I highly recommend this classic, fun, and challenging game.  You can watch a video of the kick-out method here

Hoppy taws are also available for purchase on the hoppy taws site.

Give it a try!  I bet your students will love these classic games too!

 

Animal warm-up

Free-Vector-Animals

 

Add some fun and creativity to your warm-ups with this animal warm-up.   It is perfect for your youngest students!

Set up 4 or more cones around the perimeter of your space.  As children enter, instruct them to choose a cone and sit next to it.  Choose an animal for the students to imitate.  For example, I started with a seal.  I had the students lay on their bellies and stretch their “flippers” behind their back.  Then they seal-walked by pulling themselves with their flippers to the next closest cone.  We repeated with a new animal.  “Stand up and stretch your quadricep.  Now use your quadriceps to jump like a frog to the next cone.”  Once we had done 4 animals (or as many as you have cones set up) as a group, I placed a label on each cone that matched the animals we had just practiced.  One cone was labeled “seal”, one was “frog”, “bear”, and “crab”.  I played music and starting at their current cone the students would move like that animal until they got to the next cone.  They then read the label and switched their movement to a different animal.  We continued for about 3 minutes in this fashion.  Total time  equals about 8 minutes and the students were warmed up and ready to go.  My students love to use their imagination with movement!

Warm-up dance for Christmastime

Untitled design-4

I am very insecure when it comes to teaching dances.  However, this particular dance is so cute and easy that even I can remember and teach it.  I used it as a warm-up activity because it gets your heart rate going and is simple to teach.

Use the song Trepak from the Nutcracker.  It is just over 2 minutes long.  Movement starts right at the first note.

one arm up in the air

2nd arm up in the air

Walk in a circle for 8 counts, ending facing front

Repeat 4 times

4 heel kicks on each foot (total 8 counts)

8 straight jumps

4 heel kicks on each foot

8 straight jumps

4 heel kicks per foot

2 heel kicks per foot

single heel kicks (total of 4 on each foot, going back and forth)

one arm up

2nd arm up

walk in a circle 8 counts

one arm up

2nd arm up

walk in a circle 32 counts (as the song ends, I have the students raise both hands and bow)

That’s it.  I go through each movement beforehand without telling them it is a dance.  Then just start the music and begin.  They immediately smile and get into it.  Repeat 2 times so they learn then do.  Kindergarten I did not count the heel kicks — just randomly kick.

Using stations/centers/rotations in PE class

A popular day in my PE class is when we do “PE centers” (or rotation stations).  As many classroom teachers use centers as a way to teach small groups, the students are familiar with rotating through different stations and like seeing it in a PE setting.  And they love the variety.  I find it a good way to mix in favorites with something new or a skill I want to work on.

Here is an example of how I used centers this week with my first and second grade classes:

We have been working on the skill of dribbling a ball, as well as bouncing and catching.  I had taught lessons the previous 2 weeks focusing on these skills.  Today I began class by teaching them the game of straddle ball.  I let them play the game for about 5 minutes with the class divided into 3 groups.  While they were playing I set up 3 stations.  Our 3 centers were:

  1. Dribbling practice
  2. Straddle ball
  3. Shooting

For station one I threw down about 12 poly spots.  Students had to stand on a spot and dribble 10 times, then move to another spot and repeat.  When they hit 100 dribbles they come and give me a high five and then try to get to 200, etc.   We had played this game the week before so they were familiar with it and needed no explanation.  This was the station where I focused my time to help those that were still struggling with dribbling with one hand only.

Station 2 was just continuing the game I had just taught.  They were loving that game so it gave them more time to play, but also broke things up to keep it from getting too wild (as games often do if they go too long).

Station 3 was very informal.  I set up two small, portable, shorter hoops that I have in the same area and the standard level wall mount hoop.  I gave no formal instruction and just let them experiment.  My students are always begging to use my small hoops so it gave them that opportunity.

I played music and stopped it when it was time to rotate stations.  I was able to focus on the dribbling skill with a small number of students.  They always love it when we do centers.   I use them with all grade levels periodically with as few as 3 centers and as many as 12.  Usually it is a formal rotation as I’ve described, but I also sometimes let them choose and move through stations at their own pace.

Kindergarten and spatial awareness

One of my main objectives with my kindergarten classes is to teach them spatial awareness and control.  We do a lot of games that have them moving around the gym in random patterns trying to keep them from “popping bubbles”.  Today while we were playing I told them that if the popped someone’s bubble (ran into someone)  they had to come to a certain location and sit for 5 seconds and then rejoin the game.  I couldn’t believe how well it worked!  They all tried so much harder to stay in their own space.  Their concentration was adorable.  They were also very honest about sitting out for the 5 seconds when contact occured.  Give this idea a try with any of your younger grades!

Fire and Ice Tag game

My first and second graders love tag games.  This is a fun spin on frozen tag.

4-5 blue yarn balls

3 red yarn balls

The blue yarn balls represent “ice”.  Students with ice are “it” and try and tag others.  If you are tagged by ice you must freeze.  I have them put their arms up so everyone can tell they are frozen.  The red balls represent “fire”.  Students with fire try and save frozen students by unthawing the ice (tagging with red ball).  Stop the game every 3-4 minutes and trade out who is playing fire and ice.

Scoops and Balls

We have some fun new equipment at our school this year:  plastic scoops and wiffle balls.  I used the equipment in two separate lessons with my youngest classes.

Lesson 1:

Each person has a scoop and their own ball.  I start by having them roll the ball on the floor and try and scoop it up without using their hands.  I demonstrate that they need to scoop the opposite direction from where the ball is rolling.  That way it rolls into their scoop.  Next we toss the ball out of our scoop, let it bounce once or twice on the floor and then catch.  For those that get comfortable with that, I show them how to toss, spin around, and then catch off the 2nd or 3rd bounce.  Finally, we move into tossing and catching without a bounce.  We start with low tosses (head high), then move to medium (high as you can reach), and then high tosses.  This lesson works best indoors on a gym floor.

Lesson 2:

This lesson moves the students into using the scoops and balls with a partner.  I start by having them all choose a scoop.  Then I have them find a partner that has a different color scoop (good way to mix them up!).  You can then move the students through a sequence of activities.  Vary your sequence depending on time, ability, and interest.

1. roll the ball to your partner — scoop it up without using hands

2.  low toss the ball to your partner; if you catch it take a baby step farther away and try again

3.  repeat #2 with higher tosses

4.  stand back to back with your partner, each take a giant step away from each other, the partner without the ball turns and faces their partner’s back, the partner with the ball tosses the ball over head for their partner to catch

5.  try jogging slowly and tossing the ball back and forth

I did this lesson outside on the grass.  My students especially like #4.  Fun for a spring day!

“UNO” warm-up game

I pulled out an old set of “UNO” cards this week and used them for a quick and easy warm-up with my K, 1, and 2 classes.

Give each child an UNO card.  Assign each color a locomotor movement.  For example:

red=skip

green = slither like a snake

yellow=gallop

blue=swim (arm motion)

wild=your choice

Start some fun music and the children perform the locomotor movement associated with their card.  When the music stops, they must trade cards with someone.  Repeat about every 30 seconds.  Not only was this a good warm-up, but a chance for me to assess locomotor skills.  I focused on the skip and watched those students only.  If someone was having a hard time with it, I could step in and help them out and the rest of the class was still busy and active.

“Frozen” tag

Does anyone else have young classes that are obsessed with the movie Frozen?  My students love it when I put on Frozen music for them to listen to while we are doing our activities.  We have danced with ribbon wands to Frozen, learned to scarf juggle to Frozen, rolled balls, etc, etc.  They can’t get enough of that soundtrack!  And while I am getting sick of it, I love it when they are all engaged in a physical activity while singing at the top of their lungs a Frozen song!  So, here is an old game with a new Frozen twist . . .

The game is usually called “stuck in the mud”.  I changed it to “frozen tag” and we listen to “Frozen Heart” while we play.  Choose 3-4 children to be taggers.  I use a yarn ball for them to tag with.  When the music begins, they try and tag other students.  When you are tagged you must freeze with your legs spread apart into a bridge.  To get “unfrozen”  another student must crawl under your legs.  Play for a few minutes and then change-up who your taggers are.  You can also designate the movement used — instead of running you must fast-walk, skip, gallop, etc.

I usually play tag games only outdoors, not in the gym, to avoid injuries on the hard floor.  I found that using this music, which has a slow beat, slows the game down enough to keep the movement at a safe level for indoors.