Dodge ball alternative

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I never play dodgeball in my PE classes.  I see no point in it as it doesn’t teach any skill or get all the kids moving.  It is also dangerous and can promote bullying behaviors.  However, my students still ask to play it on a regular basis so I like this fun and engaging alternative that I call Hula Ball.

Equipment needed:  18 hula hoops per team; about 12 foam balls; cones, multi-goals, and or buckets,  about 3 per team

Goal of the game is to have 3 “hula huts” standing

Divide the students into 2 teams.  Each team must stay on their side of the gym.  On the dividing line place foam balls.  A few feet behind the dividing line each team should have a few cones, buckets, or goals; or a mixture of these.  On my go signal teams start by aiming foam balls at the opposite teams’ cones and buckets.  Each cone hit equals one hula hoop.  If you have something like a bucket that they can make a basket in, it is worth 2 hula hoops.  Once the team has 6 hula hoops they can begin building a hula hut.  Hula huts are built by placing one hoop on the ground, balancing four hoops leaning in the center, and one hoop on the top holding it all together.  Opposite teams can also aim at the hula huts to keep them from getting three huts standing and winning the game.

What I like:   It is a crazy fun, face paced, and engaging game.  Balls are being thrown at objects not people so I had no injuries occur.  It requires teamwork and strategy.  There are multiple things going on:  earning hula hoops, building the huts (this is not easy), guarding the built huts, knocking down the opposite team’s huts.  Every person had a job and was involved.

What I didn’t like:  Not much, but it is tricky to keep the huts standing and I worried about the kids getting frustrated.  We played for a solid 30 minutes with no winner, though, and I received no negative feedback from my students.

All in all this game is a definite keeper.  My students had a great time and left sweating!

Heart rate lesson plan

My main goal in PE class is to keep the kids moving while they are with me.  In addition, I am trying to fit in some mini lessons this year that help my students gain an understanding of fitness and give them tools to pursue health and fitness on their own.  I keep them short and simple to minimize the time they have to sit and listen.  Today I taught a mini lesson on heart rate to my 3rd and 4th graders.  I went really well.  Here is an outline:

As students arrive I had them lie down on the gym floor and relax.  We call this “hawaii” in my class.  I timed them lying down for 2 minutes while I talked to them about relaxing each muscle, taking deep breaths, etc.  Then I had them sit up slowly and find the pulse in their neck.  I explained that the pulse would tell them how fast or slow their heart was beating.  Some had a hard time finding it, but hopefully that will improve with practice.

Once everyone had found their pulse, I timed them for 6 seconds while they silently counted beats and then had them multiply their number by 10 to find their heartbeats per minute.  I explained the concept of resting heart rate and what it meant.

Then we all stood up and did jumping jacks for one minute.  After the minute we took our heart rate again.  It was much easier to find this time.  We compared the numbers and talked about active heart rate and why we needed to get our hearts there.

I then had them lay down again for 1 minute.  Following that minute we took heart rates and compared numbers again. I talked to them about recovery and how healthy hearts could recover quickly.

This was about a 10 minute lesson.  I plan to follow up by having them take their heart rates more regularly in class now that they have been taught how.  I also talked with them about heart rate as being a way to tell if they were working hard enough (or too hard) during PE.  Hopefully it will be a valuable addition to our class time.

Warm-up circuits

I have been doing more circuit work this year and the kids really like it.  Warm-up circuits are great because they give my students some autonomy (they choose where to start), are fast paced, and get everyone moving.  When my students enter on circuit day, they see 10-12 cones set up in a big circle.  They can choose where they start, but I give a limit to how many can be at one cone (usually 3-4 students per cone).  Each cone is labeled with an exercise. As students move around the circle they should be alternating between a stretch, a cardio exercise, and a strength exercise.  For example, calf stretch – jumping jacks – plank.  Once the students have chosen their beginning cone, I give a start signal.  Every 30 seconds I give the signal to move to the next cone.  Use a timer or music with interval breaks to keep consistency on the time.  I walk around and correct form as much as I can.  When students have gone all the way around the circle, warm-up is done!  My students look forward to circuit day and they always work hard.

Muscle mini lesson

This year in PE we are focusing on a different muscle every month.  Since I don’t want to spend any movement time having my students sit and listen, I talk about our muscle as we do our stretches.  Here is an example of a mini lesson I did this week focusing on the calf muscle.

Introduction:  We are starting a new month today so that means we have a new muscle to learn.  What was our muscle last month? (quadricep)  Where is the quadricep? This month we are going to learn about the calf.  When I stand on tip toes you will be able to see my calf muscle.  Stand in front of the group flat footed, and then go to tip toe.  Did you see the calf muscle engage?

Activity:  Everyone stand up right where you are and try standing on your tip toes.  Do you feel you muscle engaging.  Can you see the outline of your calf muscle.

Activity:  Teach a stretch for the calf muscle:  Take a big step back.  Make sure both toes point forward with your body.  Push your back heel to the ground.  Bend your back knee a little if you need to to feel the stretch.  I walk around and correct form.  Talk about the need to keep toes pointing forward to actually stretch the right muscle since this is a common mistake in form I see with my students.

Activity:  Ask for suggestions of motions that use the calf muscle and do some of them such as running or jumping rope.

As the month goes on, we will repeat our calf stretch every class period and emphasize movement activities that engage the calf muscle.

My students are loving this.  They were actually the ones who reminded me that it was a new month and asked what our new muscle would be!

Fire and Ice Tag game

My first and second graders love tag games.  This is a fun spin on frozen tag.

4-5 blue yarn balls

3 red yarn balls

The blue yarn balls represent “ice”.  Students with ice are “it” and try and tag others.  If you are tagged by ice you must freeze.  I have them put their arms up so everyone can tell they are frozen.  The red balls represent “fire”.  Students with fire try and save frozen students by unthawing the ice (tagging with red ball).  Stop the game every 3-4 minutes and trade out who is playing fire and ice.

Visual aids for PE

I am working this year to add some science into my PE classes so I decided to focus on learning the names of major muscle groups.  I made this fun bulletin board to add interest and add a fun visual image to my gym.  As you can see, we are going to focus on a muscle group each month.  As the school year moves along, I will add more labels to my HULK visual.  This popular character not only catches the attention of my young students, but his bulk makes the muscle groups easy to see.  I also showed my students a realistic photo of the muscular system inside a human body as I taught a mini lesson on muscles.  When we do our warm-up session, I focus on some stretches and activities that use the quadricep and talk as we stretch.  It has been a fun way to introduce some vocabulary.
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How was your summer?

School is back in session and at my school PE specialty starts the very first day.  I like to get the kids moving in between some talking about rules and expectations.  This is a game I played on the first day, very first thing as the students walk in my door.

I spread poly spots randomly around the gym.  1 poly spot per student, no extras.

As the students arrive, I instruct them to stand on a spot and freeze.

I start the game by saying something I did during the summer.  For example, “this summer I went swimming”, “this summer I ate a popsicle”.  Then everyone who also did that thing has to move off their spot and quickly find another spot.  The person left without a spot gives the next summer activity and everyone moves again.  I encourage them to use broad statements so that lots of people have to move.

It is a fun, simple game with no “outs”.  The students like sharing their summer activities.  We played for about 5 minutes to get things going this year.

organizing teams

I teach over 800 students every week, 30 minute classes, about 30 students per class.  I need efficient ways to divide my students into different size groups for different activities.  Sometimes I want like abilities together  and sometimes I like to mix skill levels.  Here are a couple ideas I use to divide classes up into teams:

1.  Play music and have the students just walk or dance around the room.  When the music stops they stand toe to toe with # (designate size of group by holding up number of fingers) of people.  I sometimes add restrictions such as wearing the same color, #boys#girls, etc.  Sometimes I repeat 2 or 3 times, telling them each time that they can’t have someone in their group who was in it the last round (good way to mix up friends)

2.  For outside, as the class arrives I give them a fitness task to complete.  As each child finishes I hand them a jersey to put on.  I have all my colors out and pre-counted so that as I hand them a jersey, I can mix up who is wearing what color.  Since my most athletic kids tend to finish the fitness task first, I can give each one a new color and have them evenly distributed.  Same idea with my slow students.  I end up with teams evenly divided and marked.  I sometimes have them do an activity with a partner wearing a different color jersey to keep them guessing!

These are my favorite and easiest team divisors.  How do you divide classes?

Pass the Pig

I like games that disguise that we are working on fitness.  In other words, I like to get them moving in a fun way so that they don’t realize they are working out.  This is a fun and easy game that targets core fitness.

Divide class up into teams of about 5.  Teams lie down on their backs in a line with shoulders touching.  I use a rubber pig or chicken (1 per team).  My students love any game where they get to use these — they are just fun!  Beginning player puts the pig in between his/her feet and passes it to the next person.  No hands are allowed!  If the pig gets dropped, it must be picked up with feet.  Once a player has passed the pig, they get up and run to the end of the line so that the line keeps rotating centipede style.  I play music and see how far down the gym each team can get their pig before the music stops.  If they get to the end, they must start the pig coming back.

It is a quick 5-minute game that my students really like.

Builders and bulldozers

This is a commonly played game with many different names, including “wreck-it-ralph”.  If you haven’t tried it, the game is very active and always a favorite with my littlest students.

Set-up cones and/or bowling pins randomly around the play space.  Assign about one-third of the class to be “bulldozers”.  The bulldozers run around and knock over the pins.  They may only use one hand and no kicking is allowed.  The rest of the class play the “builders”.  The builders set up the cones knocked over by the bulldozers.  I use fun music as a start/stop signal.  Play several short rounds trading the builders and bulldozers every time.  They all love being the bulldozers!

My classes love this game!  It really gets the heart rate up too!  My dislike is the amount of equipment for just a short game.  You need a lot of cones/pins.  I usually tie it with another activity where we already have those items out.  Have each student grab one or two pins and set them somewhere on the floor to make set-up easy.